Press Release Sample | Who can predict their risk of disease?

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Who can predict their risk of disease? Body mass index is linked to people’s predictions about their future illness risk.
16th April 2018

Overweight and obese adults frequently over-estimate or under-estimate their risk of developing diseases such as diabetes and breast cancer, according to research from Harvard Medical School and the Washington University School of Medicine.

The study involved 4703 adult primary care patients from Boston, Massachusetts, who provided information about their lifestyle and family history. Participants were asked whether, compared to an average person of the same age, they saw themselves as being at a lower, higher, or average risk of developing each of four illnesses: diabetes, breast cancer, heart disease, and colon cancer. Their answers were compared to individual risk reports calculated by the “Your Health Snapshot” service.

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Writing Sample | Science in Video Games- What makes Overwatch special?

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Although I’m both a science enthusiast and a video game fan, those interests don’t often intersect. Scientist characters in video games are usually feared (or laughed at) from a distance, rather than being understandable or sympathetic. Worse, they are limited to two narrow roles:

The “Mad scientist” –  a friendly but distant and absent-minded tinkerer, whose inventions take on a life of their own or wind up as destructive rather than helpful.

The “Bad scientist”- a character who focuses entirely on their intellect and considers themselves superior to non-scientists. They can be obsessed with finishing their research or completing their next latest invention, regardless of its use or consequences. Many take utiliarianism to an extreme, seeing no problem with immoral or hurtful acts if they might achieve a greater good.

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Beach Break Science

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Module: Writing Science
Group Task: to produce a 16-page magazine which communicated science to a non-specialist audience.
Mark: 81%

 

 

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Opinion Piece | Why the Oreo advert controversy could help YouTube.

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This opinion piece was originally written in early 2015, as an assignment for a journalism course I attended.

This week, YouTube has found itself in trouble again… over Oreos™. More specifically, over what legal requirements video bloggers must follow when making promotional content.

The videos in question, commissioned by Oreo™ parent company Mondelez, feature YouTube stars challenging friends to an Oreo-eating race. I watched a video by musician Emma Blackery, and one by radio presenter duo Dan Howell and Phil Lester. Both videos opened with their host(s) discussing how they recieved an invitation email from Oreo™, and how other YouTubers were also taking part. Both presenters also prominently displayed the messages “this is a paid for advertisement”, and “thanks to Oreo for helping make this video happen!” in their video description.

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