Writing Sample | Science in Video Games- What makes Overwatch special?

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Although I’m both a science nerd and a video game fan, those interests don’t often intersect. Scientist characters in video games are usually feared (or laughed at) from a distance, rather than being understandable or sympathetic. Worse, they are limited to two narrow roles:

The “Mad scientist” –  a friendly but distant and absent-minded tinkerer, whose inventions take on a life of their own or wind up as destructive rather than helpful.

The “Bad scientist”- a character who focuses entirely on their intellect and considers themselves superior to non-scientists. They can be obsessed with finishing their research or completing their next latest invention, regardless of its use or consequences. Many take utiliarianism to an extreme, seeing no problem with immoral or hurtful acts if they might achieve a greater good.

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Writing Sample | First Impression- “The Two Cultures”

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I was introduced to “The Two Cultures” in the first hour of my scicomm MSc, in a lecture on the history of scicomm. “The Two Cultures” was placed proudly on the timeline, alongside documents which were fundamental to the field, so I wanted to study it for myself.

Originally “The Two Cultures” was a lecture, spoken by scientist-turned-fiction-author C. P. Snow in 1959. Snow’s titular cultures were “people of the humanities and literature” and “people of the sciences”. In his lecture, Snow sketched out divisions between these cultures using anecdotes from his experiences as a novelist among scientists and a scientist among literary intellectuals. He blamed this divide on Britain’s education system; to him, the system forced people to specialise too early and prioritised humanities at the expense of science and engineering.

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Beach Break Science

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Module: Writing Science
Group Task: to produce a 16-page magazine which communicated science to a non-specialist audience.
Mark: 81%

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